Monday, 19 July 2010

Cup-of-tea cake

Back in May I spent a week at home with my parents. My Mum had made a lovely "cup-of-tea cake" from a recipe published in The Times as part of their "Eat with the ancestors" column. I would add a link to the recipe on The Times website ... but since Mr Murdoch decided to make us pay for the privilege of browsing Times Online, I thought I would put it on my blog for you. This cake is delicious - go and make one straight away!!

The Story Behind The Cake

Lucy Kihlstom wrote that:
"My grandmother, Peggy Pepler passed down her cup-of-tea cake recipe to my mother ... It's a wartime cake, so their are no eggs in the ingredients. I never liked sponge cakes as a child, so my mother made this every week when I was growing up in Sussex in the Seventies. I'd see her melting the margarine and sultanas in the tea, and get excited because I knew she was making it. I remember eating great chunks of it after school.
She wrote the recipe down for me, and I make it now for my children. It improves if kept for a day or so".

The Recipe

2 cups of cold tea
8oz caster sugar
8oz margarine
8oz sultanas
1lb self raising flour
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
1/2 tsp mixed spice
demerara sugar for sprinkling

The Method

Put tea, margarine and sultanas in a pan. Simmer for 3 minutes or more until melted. Cool the mixture. Mix all dry ingredients, then add to the cooled mixture. Pour mixture into a greased and lined deep 8in cake tin and sprinkle the demerara sugar on the top. Bake for 1 1/2 hours in a moderate oven at 350F (150C, gas mark 3)

I'm just waiting for the mixture to cool!

4 comments:

Kandi said...

How lovely, I will try this, thanks for that!
Kandi x

Florence and Mary said...

Oooh sounds good!

Victoria x

Sheila said...

What a lovely post, i think i will try the cake, my Grama often comes round and i think it would be a really good surprise for her to see a cake she would remember well!!
Sheila.
x

Val said...

Interesting recipe. I must admit that I've never seen a cake recipe that contains tea before - perhaps because I'm an American? I'm very intrigued, though. Do you use just a regular breakfast blend for this?